1961 Volvo P1800 project, part 12

The body is finally stripped:

As mentioned in part 11, I discovered that the top bolt holding the vacuum tank was a Phillip head screw and obviously installed BEFORE the fenders were installed.

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 brake tank screws

After a fair amount of “fiddling” we got the screw out. If you read up on Volvo 1800 history you will learn that the bodies were made by a company called Pressed Steel a few miles south of Glasgow. They were then sent on to Jensen for assembly.

Some smart ass at Pressed Steel grabbed a Phillip head screw for the top mounting of this tank as I am sure it was installed before the front fender was welded to the body.  Just to really mess with my head, they used hex bolts on the lower mounting point. Oh well!

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 brake tank

This was an interesting surprice after I got the tank down. It felt very heavy. Guess what? It was full of break fluid. About two liters to be exact. I am going to guess that the brake booster failed at some point and the vacuum started to suck in the brake fluid. What is amazing is how much brake fluid the owner must have been adding to the brake cylinder.

I feel sorry for the poor owner that had to add fluid to that little master cylinder as the fluid was mysteriously disappearing! Maybe this was going on over many years, who knows.

The Jig is up!

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 frame jig

I built a metal frame and I added support beams that will hold the body to the frame so it can be transported to paint stripping and body shop.

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 empty body

I sacrificed my lawn tractor trailer for it’s wheels and also the beam that connects to the tractor. It is going to stripping in late April 2016.

Comparing equipment between the 1964 parts car and this 1961 car reveals some subtle differences.

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 speedo

Like the tachometer for example. The red line on the 1961 is at 6000 rpm. The red line…ish starts at 5500. That is code for: Hey Sven, you better start thinking about popping this baby in to another gear or your push rods will start denting your hood!

By the way,  these gauges are just gorgeous!

 

1964 Volvo Jensen P1800 speedo

This one is not so gorgeous but it is from the 1964 parts car.  The red line starts at 6500 rpm. I guess Volvo got a little braver or they got better valve springs…or both.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 fuel gauge

Also, the fuel gauge is different. The indicator stems from the center unlike the ’64 model where it is off to the side. Not a big deal but I want to make sure I don’t mix them up.

 

1964 Volvo Jensen P1800 fuel gauge

1964 gauge. See how the needle stems from the side as opposed to the center.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 trim piece

Another note for the nuance department: The metal trim piece that is located inside the car on the top of the B-pillar was made of aluminum. (top) The later cars had this made in stainless.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 modular shop

Modular shop. Having the axles on the wheel dollies help when shop space is tight.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 key lock

I finally got the ignition lock cylinder back. I was very excited that they were able to make a key but the pretty chrome fascia was now sporting a big scratch. Idiots!

I will be looking for a new cylinder I guess. Got one? Early style with small cylinder diameter…please  Email me

Folks along the way:

One of the fun aspects of playing with old cars is the people you meet along the way.

Having the same interest is reason enough to spark a conversation between two strangers. Maybe they have that part you are looking for or vice verse or just comparing notes in general.

Dave Lucas in Columbus, Ohio checked in with me. He is knee deep in a restoration of a 1963 Volvo P1800. This is the before picture:

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Dave’s P1800 is chassis number 6065 so I am thinking it was assembled in Sweden. The transmission and engine has been rebuilt so now he is working on the body and interior. We look forward to updates.

 

Lucas 1963 Volvo P1800 dog

We know Dave is a good guy as he is also a dog person. Here his best friend is checking out the dismal back seat! “I think I will ride shotgun in the passenger seat”

 

Gary Ramstad 1967 Volvo 1800S

Gary Ramstad from Seattle is almost finished with his 1967 Volvo 1800S. He named it “Puzzle” as the assembly of all the interior pieces resembles a puzzle.

Mo later…