1961 Volvo P1800 project, part 16

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 paint and rust stripping

A lonely Volvo P1800 in a sea of Camaros, Mustangs and trucks. The body was dropped off in a “mall” of hot rod shops.

 

Hot rod shop

A quick peek in the hot rod shop revealed what is hot: MUSCLE CARS!! Pro Touring muscle cars is BIG. Let’s just say that Art Morrison is doing JUST fine!

OK, enough of that!

Since this is a unibody car I have elected to have the car dipped in order to remove all paint and rust. This treatment will remove all rust inside channels as well that you can’t get inside.

I have heard the anecdotal stories how the acid stays in seams and cause problems later. I discussed this in great length with the owner and he had not experienced any problems. This company has over 40 years experience with this. The last step of cleaning and neutralizing of the acid is the key.

65-Ford-Mustang-after-acid-dipping-2

Good eye there, skipper! That is not a Volvo. For informational purposes only, get it?

It is a rather elaborate process:

  • First it is submerged in a hot tank at 200 degrees
  • Then the car is cleaned with high pressure spray.
  • Bath that treats the rust and neutralize the paint removal chemicals.
  • High pressure rinse and clean.
  • Rust prevention coating.
  • Air dry.

Regardless, I plan to open up all critical seams, like rocker panels, front fenders, door skins, rear panel and rear quarter panel so all those seams will be exposed and I can clean all mating surfaces.

Once opened up, I can even touch up with sandblasting if needed. More on this later.

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 hinge kit

“Hinge Kit” These are all the hinges and fastener needed to hang the hood, doors and the trunk. The body man will need this to line up all the panels etc.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 rear bumper parts car

This is why parts cars exists!  This 1964 coupe with chassis no 10764 is resting behind the shop and it is slowly returning to iron oxide but before that process is completed I am saving many parts for our project. I did not have the rear bumper bar, bumper bracket and the chrome piece in between the bumper sides. Now I do!

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 rear bumper bracket

Of course I could not leave the chrome alone, I had to run some 0000 steel wool over the chrome. It still needs re-chroming but I feel better now! Don’t you?

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 rear bumper bracket front 1

The bumper bracket looks like they will clean up good but it is what’s between them that worries me. Probably rust. They are conveniently rivited together!

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 rear bumper bracket front

Yup, rust.They will spend a day or two in the vinegar bath.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 rear bumper bracket 2

The rear bumper brackets are riveted as well. Note the rivet head is flush on the rear bracket as they are flush with the channel they go in to. I have to make sure I duplicate this when it goes together.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 rear axle goop removal

Goop removing session number 543!!

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 rear axle goop cutting

The goop on the rear axle is so thick that I can slice layers off…like a gyro !! Except it’s Swedish…Swyro! Glorious work!

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 rear brake backing plate

It is pretty amazing how nice most of the chassis components are like this backing plate.It is still proudly displaying the factory semi gloss black. Not bad for a 56 year old car. It is still going to get blasted and powder coated.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 motor mount broken

Come on!! How can you brake a motor mount in a 90 hp Volvo. It was repaired by adding massive amount of brazing material. The parts car will once again step up and provide a replacement.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 idler arm

The early cars used a different idler arm and based on the profile on the arm, this is indeed the original part. I have chassis number 423 and the Volvo parts book tells me that the needle bearing still available are from chassic no 500 something and forward. Yet the specs on the bearings matches my early arm exactly so maybe I will be OK.

More later..

 

Volvo P1800 logga

 

1961 Volvo P1800 project, part 15

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I am trying to catch anything that need to be done before it goes to body and paint.

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 missing nut

Like this weld nut that decided to take a walk. This nut holds the upper panel on the door. Now would be a good time to fix it. Threads are 1/4 -20.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 weld nut

I enlarged the hole enough to hold a nut in place and then used my 180 AMP metal melting device. I doused the screw and threads with anti splatter spray to make sure I didn’t weld the bolt to the nut!

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 weld nut in place

Nut job! Threads in place and all is well.

All chassis component on this car are semi flat black including the front cross member. On later cars, Volvo changed it to a blue gray color.

I found a perfect match to the black at my local powder coating company.The have a one time set up charge so it makes sense to bring in all parts for coating in one swoop.

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 ugly front end 2

It is amazing how many little parts are on one car! Like the front end, after disassembling I have another hundred…or so…parts to…ugh, to clean and keep track of.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 front spring compress

NOTE spring compressor!  PLEASE NOTE: The front A-arms are holding the front springs under EXTREME pressure. DO NOT unbolt the ball joint or A-arms without taking precautions. If this spring was to let loose it could seriously harm or kill an individual. If you are not comfortable with this task, take it to a professional.

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 front end blow apart

Sometimes I wonder why I do this :-/

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 A-arm petrified

Petrified! The dirt and grease have become petrified over 50 years.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 A-arm clean

OK, this is a bit of overkill but I like clean…I plan to blast and powder coat everything anyway.

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 cross member

Front cross member ready for the next step. I will have it dipped in the rust removing solution as well as I want any internal rust gone.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 brake stud removal

Volvo’s service manual tells me that the minimum thickness of the rotors in 12.2 mm. These were less than 10 mm so these are going in the recycle bin. The early cars had different rotors and they are no longer available. Here I am pressing out the studs so I can separate the rotor from the hub.

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 brake hub

Rotor and hub.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 brake rotor difference

Here you can see the difference between the early style (left) and the later style. The “hat” is 2 3/16 tall compared to the 1 3/4 height on the newer style. The old style lasted through chassis number 6999.

I have been told if I use the newer style caliper bracket, I can use the newer rotor. However, I also have to use the newer style backing shields and I would like to keep the original stuff. They looks very different and they are in excellent condition.

I have some ideas…more on this later.

 

Now I have to inventory all parts so they can be accounted for when I bring them to powder coating. Tip: Take lots of pictures!

1961 Volvo P1800 project, part 14

Hinges and Hardware Rust Removal

I have about a month before the body leaves for stripping and body work. The body man will need all the hinges as he will test fit of doors, hood and trunk so I am getting them cleaned up.

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 hood hinges

These are the hood hinges. Looks like something you would use for a barn door. They cleaned up well on the rotating wire wheel.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 door hinges

These are the door hinges, they look like something you would use on a very big barn door!

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 door hinges close up

After a slow dance with the wire wheel these cleaned up well. Here you can see the brass washers used to reduce friction in the hinge.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 door hinges pin

The door hinges have some wear so I have to replace the pin. Looks like they are held in place by “deforming” punch blows.

Hardware Rust Removal

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 rusty bolts vinegar

I plan to reuse as many of the original bolts as possible for originality. Whether it is BUFO or Rubery Owens they should go back where they came from. This means I have to make them look new again. I am trying various forms of cleaning and rust removal, everything from just plain vinegar to Evaporust.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 part cleaner

Dunking rusty bolts in rust removal solution is one part of this job but it does not remove paint. I borrowed this vibrator/tumbler cleaner from a friend and it will help me make the fasteners look new again. I am using two kinds of media. I taped in to the floor as it has a tendency to take a walk when in running..

To learn more about this I Googled “vibrator cleaner” and that gave me results NOT related to rusty old cars. Think before Googling! Just saying!

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 rusty bolts

This is what I started with.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 bolts after vinegar

This is what the above hardware looks like after one night in vinegar. They look better than the bolts that was treated with Evaporust. So good ‘ol household vinegar wins.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 shiny bolt

Here they are after a night in the tumbler with walnut shells. Looks fantastic. This will be a great base when I have them plated.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 shiny bolts

Here is a whole bunch of shiny stuff. Satisfying.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 part cleaner pyramids

This is the more aggressive media that also removes paint.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 ugly front end

I have about a month before the car go car to paint stripping I have plenty of work to do. The front end will be blown apart and restored.

 

1961 Volvo P1800 project, part 13

We don’t trust rust!

From Wikipedia: Rust is an iron oxide, usually red oxide formed by the reaction of iron and oxygen in the presence of water or air moisture. Rust consists of hydrated iron (as in an old Volvo), oxides Fe2O3·nH2O and iron oxide-hydroxide (FeO(OH), Fe(OH).

The next exciting stop in the restoration journey is to remove this stuff!

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 ready to go

Since this is a unibody car it is not easy to remove and stop rust inside the “frame channels”. By dipping the whole car is rust removing acid I can get all the hidden rust dissolved and then a protective rust preventative coating can be applied.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 mystery penny

After disassembling the doors I turned them upside down to empty out all the junk. I noticed a round copper object in the pile. I thought it was a penny. I was curious what year penny it would be.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 mystery volvo logo

Turns out it was a small brass or copper Volvo logo. I have never seen this before. It has very nice detailing on it. Can it be a top of a shifter? A lapel pin maybe? I button on a Volvo coveralls??  If you know, contact me!

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 empty door

Here is the door completely disassembled and they are going to enjoy a bath in the rust removing soup as well.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 visor chrome

Anything that needs to be rechromed have to be completely disassembled. These are the visor arms.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 to be chromed

The “To be chromed” box is growing. This will not be cheap!

Got some family stuff to deal with so it will be a couple of weeks until I can bring the body to the dipping company. Stay tuned.

1961 Volvo P1800 project, part 12

The body is finally stripped:

As mentioned in part 11, I discovered that the top bolt holding the vacuum tank was a Phillip head screw and obviously installed BEFORE the fenders were installed.

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 brake tank screws

After a fair amount of “fiddling” we got the screw out. If you read up on Volvo 1800 history you will learn that the bodies were made by a company called Pressed Steel a few miles south of Glasgow. They were then sent on to Jensen for assembly.

Some smart ass at Pressed Steel grabbed a Phillip head screw for the top mounting of this tank as I am sure it was installed before the front fender was welded to the body.  Just to really mess with my head, they used hex bolts on the lower mounting point. Oh well!

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 brake tank

This was an interesting surprice after I got the tank down. It felt very heavy. Guess what? It was full of break fluid. About two liters to be exact. I am going to guess that the brake booster failed at some point and the vacuum started to suck in the brake fluid. What is amazing is how much brake fluid the owner must have been adding to the brake cylinder.

I feel sorry for the poor owner that had to add fluid to that little master cylinder as the fluid was mysteriously disappearing! Maybe this was going on over many years, who knows.

The Jig is up!

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 frame jig

I built a metal frame and I added support beams that will hold the body to the frame so it can be transported to paint stripping and body shop.

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 empty body

I sacrificed my lawn tractor trailer for it’s wheels and also the beam that connects to the tractor. It is going to stripping in late April 2016.

Comparing equipment between the 1964 parts car and this 1961 car reveals some subtle differences.

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 speedo

Like the tachometer for example. The red line on the 1961 is at 6000 rpm. The red line…ish starts at 5500. That is code for: Hey Sven, you better start thinking about popping this baby in to another gear or your push rods will start denting your hood!

By the way,  these gauges are just gorgeous!

 

1964 Volvo Jensen P1800 speedo

This one is not so gorgeous but it is from the 1964 parts car.  The red line starts at 6500 rpm. I guess Volvo got a little braver or they got better valve springs…or both.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 fuel gauge

Also, the fuel gauge is different. The indicator stems from the center unlike the ’64 model where it is off to the side. Not a big deal but I want to make sure I don’t mix them up.

 

1964 Volvo Jensen P1800 fuel gauge

1964 gauge. See how the needle stems from the side as opposed to the center.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 trim piece

Another note for the nuance department: The metal trim piece that is located inside the car on the top of the B-pillar was made of aluminum. (top) The later cars had this made in stainless.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 modular shop

Modular shop. Having the axles on the wheel dollies help when shop space is tight.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 key lock

I finally got the ignition lock cylinder back. I was very excited that they were able to make a key but the pretty chrome fascia was now sporting a big scratch. Idiots!

I will be looking for a new cylinder I guess. Got one? Early style with small cylinder diameter…please  Email me

Folks along the way:

One of the fun aspects of playing with old cars is the people you meet along the way.

Having the same interest is reason enough to spark a conversation between two strangers. Maybe they have that part you are looking for or vice verse or just comparing notes in general.

Dave Lucas in Columbus, Ohio checked in with me. He is knee deep in a restoration of a 1963 Volvo P1800. This is the before picture:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Dave’s P1800 is chassis number 6065 so I am thinking it was assembled in Sweden. The transmission and engine has been rebuilt so now he is working on the body and interior. We look forward to updates.

 

Lucas 1963 Volvo P1800 dog

We know Dave is a good guy as he is also a dog person. Here his best friend is checking out the dismal back seat! “I think I will ride shotgun in the passenger seat”

 

Gary Ramstad 1967 Volvo 1800S

Gary Ramstad from Seattle is almost finished with his 1967 Volvo 1800S. He named it “Puzzle” as the assembly of all the interior pieces resembles a puzzle.

Mo later…

1961 Volvo P1800 project, part 9

Damn, there is a lot of parts on a car. The stripping continues so we can go to body work.

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 door handle removal

The original door panels are nice enough that I did not want to tear them off.  The sheet behind the crank is teflon designed to be used between spring leaf springs. Slippery and very strong. I used it to protect the panel to get the tool behind to remove the clip.

Well, so I thought…there was NO flexibility in the door panel and the rubber ring behind it. I had to break the chrome ring to get to it.  Blasphemy, yeah probably but I saved a 57 year old door panel.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 door panel

This is nice enough so someone could use this for a driver.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 nice chrome early style door

These early P1800 doors are nothing like the later model Volvos. The top plate unbolts and then you get the whole vent window, crank mechanism and glass out. It makes it very serviceable though.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 nice chrome

The chrome on the vent window assembly is absolutely amazing. I may not even have to replate it.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 nice chrome bandy stick

These “bandy stick” door moldings are cast as opposed to the front fender pieces that made from stainless stock.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 pentrating stuff

My new friend: PB “Catalyst-High Flashpoint-Magnetic-Lubricant-Bolt Buster” are some of the buzz words used by the manufacturer so it must be good, right? Used by Volvo restorers and spacemen.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 flamed

When the above mentioned “Catalyst-High Flashpoint-Magnetic-Lubricant-Bolt Buster” spray ain’t making it the solution is heat. To remove the moldings I heated the nuts to a glowing red and then I could break them loose. Hot nuts are good!

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 wet blanket

Having a wet towel over the stainless kept it cool to prevent any discoloring.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 fender moulding off

It was 57 years ago since the front fender moulding was separated from the body.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 moulding clips

My friend Gary calls his 1967 1800S the “puzzle” for all the parts on a Volvo 1800 car. Here is one of the reasons: These are the clips that holds the front fender moulding in place. They are all different. They were secured inside the moulding by a piece of fiber board pressed in behind it! Classy!

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 stainless chrome

I was convinced that the rear fin molding was cast as it appeared to be chrome and it has spiderweb cracks and small pitting. However, it turns out that it is not magnetic so it must be stainless after all. Chrome stainless…go figure…never heard of it. Need to do some reasearch.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 spreading out

It is amazing how much room a car take up when you blow it apart. Parts everywhere!

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 quarter window

Quarter window and fin mouldings are out.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 oil press clamp brass

I am not sure why I find this to be so cool but the clamp that holds the oil pressure line is made out of brass. Of course I had to polish it. The sad part is that it is under the dash but now we all know it’s there.

 

1961 Volvo Jensen P1800 heat duct

The air duct between the heater and the body looks like it was made in shop class!
I give it a C. Having said that, this is the cool part with a low serial number car as some parts are still crude. Part of the history.

’nuff for now!

A closer look at Tom Lamb’s 1962 Volvo P1800

Since I am restoring a 1961 Volvo P1800 it is always great to connect with other owners of the same model. Chances  are that they have some words of wisdom for us or maybe even a spare of that strange-looking bolt that is missing on mine. You get the idea…

Image2-Volvo1962P1800Jenson-Lamb

Tom Lamb in California owns this beauty.

This is a 1962 model with chassis number 4937 and as you can see  Volvo still used the full wheel covers. In 1963 Volvo changed things up by equipping the P1800 with the corporate rolling stock consisting of a solid body colored steel wheel with the large chrome hub cap.

 

LAMB-P1800-DASH_GAUGES 1

How can you not want to pilot a vintage car with gauges as cool as these? They look even better at night as they emit a warm turquoise glow.

6500 RPM redline tells the driver when it is time to shift! Even though the five main bearing engine is very strong that is all the push rod assembly need to be exposed to.

 

1962Volvo-P1800-4937- Jensen-Lamb1

The cool part with these early wheel covers is that they scream EARLY CAR! …as in “I am special”

 

1962 Volvo - P1800 Jensen - No. 4937- Interior

Take this in: You are ready to enter a Swedish Grand Tourer right here by sitting down in this flawless red interior.

You will spend many hours here enjoying the short distinct shifter operating the smooth synchromesh transmission and comfortable highway cruising courtesy of the Laycock de Normanville  overdrive.

All this while enjoying the glorious music presented by the twin SU carburetors when approaching the aforementioned 6500 RPM redline.

1962P1800-PARAMOUNTSTUDIO-LAMB

The car was used for Volvo’s 60th anniversary celebration.

Tom restored the car about twelve years ago but it looks like it was done yesterday. It was restored to stock specifications with some small exceptions. For example, the distributor is now hosting a no maintenance electronic ignition system replacing the old points. Besides the obvious benefit Tom may even have picked up another horsepower or two.

Thanks Tom,  for sharing your car with us.  You set the bar high and that is now my challenge to reach the same level.

Photo: Tom Lamb